• Les garanties PROVENCEPASS :
  • Les meilleures
    attractions de Provence

    Visites, loisirs, sorties
  • Prix en ligne
    le plus bas

    Meilleure offre Internet !
  • Réservation simple
    et rapide de tickets

    Paiements sécurisés

    Lubéron

    Moulin Saint Augustin

    Catégorie : Étiquette :

    Adresse

    Adresse

    2800 Route d'Apt

    Ville

    Cousteller Oppède

    Code postal

    84580

    Site web

    http://www.moulin-saintaugustin.com/

    Geolocalisation


    Description

    The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste!


    informations pratiques

    Informations tarif

    Gratis

    Avis (0)

    Avis


    Il n’y pas encore d’avis.

    Be the first to review “Moulin Saint Augustin”


      Luberon

      Moulin Saint Augustin

      Le Moulin Saint-Augustin est situé sur la rive droite du Coulon, à cheval sur les communes d’Oppède et de Ménerbes. Son histoire est ancienne : il y a longtemps il est le quartier des Hermitants qui y fabriquaident surto…

      Catégorie : Étiquette :

      Adresse

      Adresse

      2800 Route d'Apt

      Ville

      Cousteller Oppède

      Code postal

      84580

      Site web

      http://www.moulin-saintaugustin.com/

      Geolocalisation


      Description

      Le Moulin Saint-Augustin est situé sur la rive droite du Coulon, à cheval sur les communes d’Oppède et de Ménerbes. Son histoire est ancienne : il y a longtemps il est le quartier des Hermitants qui y fabriquaident surtout de la farine, mais aussi du vin, de l’huile d’olive et du miel. En 1210, les moines partent pour Sénanque et revendent la propriété au Comte de Châteauneuf d’Anjou. Celui- ci la revendra à son tour à la famille du Marquis de Sade, à laquelle succéderont encore plusieurs familles de particuliers. L’activité du Moulin s’arrête avant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, et ne reprend qu’en 2000-2001. Grâce à la famille Nibbio qui l’acquiert en 1980, le bâtiment de pierre reprend vie. Il produit cette fois, non plus de la farine, mais de l’huile d’olive… qu’ils sauront vous faire apprécier.utique des Saveurs Accolée au Moulin, la boutique vous accueille dans un cadre chaleureux. Elle met en valeur diverses productions locales, avec un souci éthique et écologique. Vous y trouverez des produits alimentaires (huiles, vinaigres, tapenades, apéritifs) et cosmétiques (savons, crèmes et lotions), ainsi que des ouvrages sur l’olivier, sa culture et bien sûr… l’huile d’olive !e ! Pour assouvir la curiosité du néophyte, une visite des lieux s’impose. Des vestiges, témoins de l’activité du Moulin dans des temps plus reculés ont été mis en valeur ici et là…. Dans la cour, une collection d’anciens outils agricoles est exposée. Jadis, ils servaient au travail du blé, de la garance et de la lavande. La meule principale et son mécanisme à eau reposent dans la boutique. Ils vous seront commentés sur demande, de mai à septembre. Et pourquoi ne pas profiter du site ? Avant de vous promener le long du Coulon, installez-vous : des tables de pique-nique sont à votre disposition Parmi les variétés qui font la renommée des huiles d’olives françaises, l’Aglandau se distingue de ses cousines par un goût surprenant, tantôt assimilé à l’artichaut, à la verdure ou aux fruits (poire, banane, pomme, amande). Principale variété du Vaucluse triturée au Moulin, elle est vigoureuse et résistante, et donne une huile de grand caractère. Les olives du Moulin Saint-Augustin ont une triple provenance : Luberon, vallée du Rhône et Monts du Vaucluse. Elles sont en majeure partie récoltées à la main, et sont travaillées plus ou moins rapidement après la cueillette, selon le type d’huile que l’on souhaite obtenir. Afin de développer une qualité gustative unique, Frédéric y associe la varié- té Salonenque. Les olives sélectionnées proviennent de vieux arbres non irri- gués. D’autre part, des passionnés confient au Moulin leur production de diverses variétés : la Picholine (pour sa force poivrée et amère), la Tanche (pour ses notes d’amande), la Cailletier (pour sa douceur et sa limpidité) et la Grossane (pour sa finesse). Au total, il faudra environ 4 à 6 kg d’olives pour obtenir 1 litre du précieux liquide. Pensez-y ! En le consommant, c’est toute la robustesse et la générosité de l’arbre que vous assimilez. Et à ses innombrables bienfaits s’ajoute le plaisir de déguster…Goût Des huiles, il y en a pour tous les goûts. Elles ne servent pas seulement à préparer l’Anchoïade, la tapenade et l’aïoli. Elles mettent en valeur vos salades, et rehaussent les plats les plus délicats, y compris certains desserts ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin élabore 2 huiles aux saveurs uniques que l’on retrouve aussi parmi ses produits dérivés proposés en boutique et sur le site du Moulin. le fruité vert est obtenu à partir d’olives en début de maturité dès novembre (Saint Véran) jusqu’aux premières gelées. Aglandau et Salonenque sont travaillées trois jours après réception, et donnent à l’huile une couleur allant du vert olive au vert pomme. Le fruité possède alors une saveur ardente avec un arrière- goût d’artichaut. Le fruité mûr est plus doux : la Salonenque est cueillie à maturité et l’Aglandau est récoltée après les premières gelées (Sainte-Catherine) jusqu’à Noël. Elles donnent une huile dorée, aux notes boisées se rapprochant de l’olive noire. Le Moulin propose dans sa boutique d’autres produits dérivés de l’huile ainsi que deux huiles aromatisées à la truffe et au basilic. Ces huiles composées d’olives de Salonenque sauront charmer vos subtiles papilles. À noter : l’huile obtenue à partir de l’Aglandau et de la Salonenque a ceci de spécifique qu’elle peut aussi être utilisée pour la cuisson, sans pour autant perdre son goût ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin est situé sur la rive droite du Coulon, à cheval sur les communes d’Oppède et de Ménerbes. Son histoire est ancienne : il y a longtemps il est le quartier des Hermitants qui y fabriquaident surtout de la farine, mais aussi du vin, de l’huile d’olive et du miel. En 1210, les moines partent pour Sénanque et revendent la propriété au Comte de Châteauneuf d’Anjou. Celui- ci la revendra à son tour à la famille du Marquis de Sade, à laquelle succéderont encore plusieurs familles de particuliers. L’activité du Moulin s’arrête avant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, et ne reprend qu’en 2000-2001. Grâce à la famille Nibbio qui l’acquiert en 1980, le bâtiment de pierre reprend vie. Il produit cette fois, non plus de la farine, mais de l’huile d’olive… qu’ils sauront vous faire apprécier.utique des Saveurs Accolée au Moulin, la boutique vous accueille dans un cadre chaleureux. Elle met en valeur diverses productions locales, avec un souci éthique et écologique. Vous y trouverez des produits alimentaires (huiles, vinaigres, tapenades, apéritifs) et cosmétiques (savons, crèmes et lotions), ainsi que des ouvrages sur l’olivier, sa culture et bien sûr… l’huile d’olive !e ! Pour assouvir la curiosité du néophyte, une visite des lieux s’impose. Des vestiges, témoins de l’activité du Moulin dans des temps plus reculés ont été mis en valeur ici et là…. Dans la cour, une collection d’anciens outils agricoles est exposée. Jadis, ils servaient au travail du blé, de la garance et de la lavande. La meule principale et son mécanisme à eau reposent dans la boutique. Ils vous seront commentés sur demande, de mai à septembre. Et pourquoi ne pas profiter du site ? Avant de vous promener le long du Coulon, installez-vous : des tables de pique-nique sont à votre disposition Parmi les variétés qui font la renommée des huiles d’olives françaises, l’Aglandau se distingue de ses cousines par un goût surprenant, tantôt assimilé à l’artichaut, à la verdure ou aux fruits (poire, banane, pomme, amande). Principale variété du Vaucluse triturée au Moulin, elle est vigoureuse et résistante, et donne une huile de grand caractère. Les olives du Moulin Saint-Augustin ont une triple provenance : Luberon, vallée du Rhône et Monts du Vaucluse. Elles sont en majeure partie récoltées à la main, et sont travaillées plus ou moins rapidement après la cueillette, selon le type d’huile que l’on souhaite obtenir. Afin de développer une qualité gustative unique, Frédéric y associe la varié- té Salonenque. Les olives sélectionnées proviennent de vieux arbres non irri- gués. D’autre part, des passionnés confient au Moulin leur production de diverses variétés : la Picholine (pour sa force poivrée et amère), la Tanche (pour ses notes d’amande), la Cailletier (pour sa douceur et sa limpidité) et la Grossane (pour sa finesse). Au total, il faudra environ 4 à 6 kg d’olives pour obtenir 1 litre du précieux liquide. Pensez-y ! En le consommant, c’est toute la robustesse et la générosité de l’arbre que vous assimilez. Et à ses innombrables bienfaits s’ajoute le plaisir de déguster…Goût Des huiles, il y en a pour tous les goûts. Elles ne servent pas seulement à préparer l’Anchoïade, la tapenade et l’aïoli. Elles mettent en valeur vos salades, et rehaussent les plats les plus délicats, y compris certains desserts ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin élabore 2 huiles aux saveurs uniques que l’on retrouve aussi parmi ses produits dérivés proposés en boutique et sur le site du Moulin. le fruité vert est obtenu à partir d’olives en début de maturité dès novembre (Saint Véran) jusqu’aux premières gelées. Aglandau et Salonenque sont travaillées trois jours après réception, et donnent à l’huile une couleur allant du vert olive au vert pomme. Le fruité possède alors une saveur ardente avec un arrière- goût d’artichaut. Le fruité mûr est plus doux : la Salonenque est cueillie à maturité et l’Aglandau est récoltée après les premières gelées (Sainte-Catherine) jusqu’à Noël. Elles donnent une huile dorée, aux notes boisées se rapprochant de l’olive noire. Le Moulin propose dans sa boutique d’autres produits dérivés de l’huile ainsi que deux huiles aromatisées à la truffe et au basilic. Ces huiles composées d’olives de Salonenque sauront charmer vos subtiles papilles. À noter : l’huile obtenue à partir de l’Aglandau et de la Salonenque a ceci de spécifique qu’elle peut aussi être utilisée pour la cuisson, sans pour autant perdre son goût ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin est situé sur la rive droite du Coulon, à cheval sur les communes d’Oppède et de Ménerbes. Son histoire est ancienne : il y a longtemps il est le quartier des Hermitants qui y fabriquaident surtout de la farine, mais aussi du vin, de l’huile d’olive et du miel. En 1210, les moines partent pour Sénanque et revendent la propriété au Comte de Châteauneuf d’Anjou. Celui- ci la revendra à son tour à la famille du Marquis de Sade, à laquelle succéderont encore plusieurs familles de particuliers. L’activité du Moulin s’arrête avant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, et ne reprend qu’en 2000-2001. Grâce à la famille Nibbio qui l’acquiert en 1980, le bâtiment de pierre reprend vie. Il produit cette fois, non plus de la farine, mais de l’huile d’olive… qu’ils sauront vous faire apprécier.utique des Saveurs Accolée au Moulin, la boutique vous accueille dans un cadre chaleureux. Elle met en valeur diverses productions locales, avec un souci éthique et écologique. Vous y trouverez des produits alimentaires (huiles, vinaigres, tapenades, apéritifs) et cosmétiques (savons, crèmes et lotions), ainsi que des ouvrages sur l’olivier, sa culture et bien sûr… l’huile d’olive !e ! Pour assouvir la curiosité du néophyte, une visite des lieux s’impose. Des vestiges, témoins de l’activité du Moulin dans des temps plus reculés ont été mis en valeur ici et là…. Dans la cour, une collection d’anciens outils agricoles est exposée. Jadis, ils servaient au travail du blé, de la garance et de la lavande. La meule principale et son mécanisme à eau reposent dans la boutique. Ils vous seront commentés sur demande, de mai à septembre. Et pourquoi ne pas profiter du site ? Avant de vous promener le long du Coulon, installez-vous : des tables de pique-nique sont à votre disposition Parmi les variétés qui font la renommée des huiles d’olives françaises, l’Aglandau se distingue de ses cousines par un goût surprenant, tantôt assimilé à l’artichaut, à la verdure ou aux fruits (poire, banane, pomme, amande). Principale variété du Vaucluse triturée au Moulin, elle est vigoureuse et résistante, et donne une huile de grand caractère. Les olives du Moulin Saint-Augustin ont une triple provenance : Luberon, vallée du Rhône et Monts du Vaucluse. Elles sont en majeure partie récoltées à la main, et sont travaillées plus ou moins rapidement après la cueillette, selon le type d’huile que l’on souhaite obtenir. Afin de développer une qualité gustative unique, Frédéric y associe la varié- té Salonenque. Les olives sélectionnées proviennent de vieux arbres non irri- gués. D’autre part, des passionnés confient au Moulin leur production de diverses variétés : la Picholine (pour sa force poivrée et amère), la Tanche (pour ses notes d’amande), la Cailletier (pour sa douceur et sa limpidité) et la Grossane (pour sa finesse). Au total, il faudra environ 4 à 6 kg d’olives pour obtenir 1 litre du précieux liquide. Pensez-y ! En le consommant, c’est toute la robustesse et la générosité de l’arbre que vous assimilez. Et à ses innombrables bienfaits s’ajoute le plaisir de déguster…Goût Des huiles, il y en a pour tous les goûts. Elles ne servent pas seulement à préparer l’Anchoïade, la tapenade et l’aïoli. Elles mettent en valeur vos salades, et rehaussent les plats les plus délicats, y compris certains desserts ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin élabore 2 huiles aux saveurs uniques que l’on retrouve aussi parmi ses produits dérivés proposés en boutique et sur le site du Moulin. le fruité vert est obtenu à partir d’olives en début de maturité dès novembre (Saint Véran) jusqu’aux premières gelées. Aglandau et Salonenque sont travaillées trois jours après réception, et donnent à l’huile une couleur allant du vert olive au vert pomme. Le fruité possède alors une saveur ardente avec un arrière- goût d’artichaut. Le fruité mûr est plus doux : la Salonenque est cueillie à maturité et l’Aglandau est récoltée après les premières gelées (Sainte-Catherine) jusqu’à Noël. Elles donnent une huile dorée, aux notes boisées se rapprochant de l’olive noire. Le Moulin propose dans sa boutique d’autres produits dérivés de l’huile ainsi que deux huiles aromatisées à la truffe et au basilic. Ces huiles composées d’olives de Salonenque sauront charmer vos subtiles papilles. À noter : l’huile obtenue à partir de l’Aglandau et de la Salonenque a ceci de spécifique qu’elle peut aussi être utilisée pour la cuisson, sans pour autant perdre son goût ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin est situé sur la rive droite du Coulon, à cheval sur les communes d’Oppède et de Ménerbes. Son histoire est ancienne : il y a longtemps il est le quartier des Hermitants qui y fabriquaident surtout de la farine, mais aussi du vin, de l’huile d’olive et du miel. En 1210, les moines partent pour Sénanque et revendent la propriété au Comte de Châteauneuf d’Anjou. Celui- ci la revendra à son tour à la famille du Marquis de Sade, à laquelle succéderont encore plusieurs familles de particuliers. L’activité du Moulin s’arrête avant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, et ne reprend qu’en 2000-2001. Grâce à la famille Nibbio qui l’acquiert en 1980, le bâtiment de pierre reprend vie. Il produit cette fois, non plus de la farine, mais de l’huile d’olive… qu’ils sauront vous faire apprécier.utique des Saveurs Accolée au Moulin, la boutique vous accueille dans un cadre chaleureux. Elle met en valeur diverses productions locales, avec un souci éthique et écologique. Vous y trouverez des produits alimentaires (huiles, vinaigres, tapenades, apéritifs) et cosmétiques (savons, crèmes et lotions), ainsi que des ouvrages sur l’olivier, sa culture et bien sûr… l’huile d’olive !e ! Pour assouvir la curiosité du néophyte, une visite des lieux s’impose. Des vestiges, témoins de l’activité du Moulin dans des temps plus reculés ont été mis en valeur ici et là…. Dans la cour, une collection d’anciens outils agricoles est exposée. Jadis, ils servaient au travail du blé, de la garance et de la lavande. La meule principale et son mécanisme à eau reposent dans la boutique. Ils vous seront commentés sur demande, de mai à septembre. Et pourquoi ne pas profiter du site ? Avant de vous promener le long du Coulon, installez-vous : des tables de pique-nique sont à votre disposition Parmi les variétés qui font la renommée des huiles d’olives françaises, l’Aglandau se distingue de ses cousines par un goût surprenant, tantôt assimilé à l’artichaut, à la verdure ou aux fruits (poire, banane, pomme, amande). Principale variété du Vaucluse triturée au Moulin, elle est vigoureuse et résistante, et donne une huile de grand caractère. Les olives du Moulin Saint-Augustin ont une triple provenance : Luberon, vallée du Rhône et Monts du Vaucluse. Elles sont en majeure partie récoltées à la main, et sont travaillées plus ou moins rapidement après la cueillette, selon le type d’huile que l’on souhaite obtenir. Afin de développer une qualité gustative unique, Frédéric y associe la varié- té Salonenque. Les olives sélectionnées proviennent de vieux arbres non irri- gués. D’autre part, des passionnés confient au Moulin leur production de diverses variétés : la Picholine (pour sa force poivrée et amère), la Tanche (pour ses notes d’amande), la Cailletier (pour sa douceur et sa limpidité) et la Grossane (pour sa finesse). Au total, il faudra environ 4 à 6 kg d’olives pour obtenir 1 litre du précieux liquide. Pensez-y ! En le consommant, c’est toute la robustesse et la générosité de l’arbre que vous assimilez. Et à ses innombrables bienfaits s’ajoute le plaisir de déguster…Goût Des huiles, il y en a pour tous les goûts. Elles ne servent pas seulement à préparer l’Anchoïade, la tapenade et l’aïoli. Elles mettent en valeur vos salades, et rehaussent les plats les plus délicats, y compris certains desserts ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin élabore 2 huiles aux saveurs uniques que l’on retrouve aussi parmi ses produits dérivés proposés en boutique et sur le site du Moulin. le fruité vert est obtenu à partir d’olives en début de maturité dès novembre (Saint Véran) jusqu’aux premières gelées. Aglandau et Salonenque sont travaillées trois jours après réception, et donnent à l’huile une couleur allant du vert olive au vert pomme. Le fruité possède alors une saveur ardente avec un arrière- goût d’artichaut. Le fruité mûr est plus doux : la Salonenque est cueillie à maturité et l’Aglandau est récoltée après les premières gelées (Sainte-Catherine) jusqu’à Noël. Elles donnent une huile dorée, aux notes boisées se rapprochant de l’olive noire. Le Moulin propose dans sa boutique d’autres produits dérivés de l’huile ainsi que deux huiles aromatisées à la truffe et au basilic. Ces huiles composées d’olives de Salonenque sauront charmer vos subtiles papilles. À noter : l’huile obtenue à partir de l’Aglandau et de la Salonenque a ceci de spécifique qu’elle peut aussi être utilisée pour la cuisson, sans pour autant perdre son goût ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin est situé sur la rive droite du Coulon, à cheval sur les communes d’Oppède et de Ménerbes. Son histoire est ancienne : il y a longtemps il est le quartier des Hermitants qui y fabriquaident surtout de la farine, mais aussi du vin, de l’huile d’olive et du miel. En 1210, les moines partent pour Sénanque et revendent la propriété au Comte de Châteauneuf d’Anjou. Celui- ci la revendra à son tour à la famille du Marquis de Sade, à laquelle succéderont encore plusieurs familles de particuliers. L’activité du Moulin s’arrête avant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, et ne reprend qu’en 2000-2001. Grâce à la famille Nibbio qui l’acquiert en 1980, le bâtiment de pierre reprend vie. Il produit cette fois, non plus de la farine, mais de l’huile d’olive… qu’ils sauront vous faire apprécier.utique des Saveurs Accolée au Moulin, la boutique vous accueille dans un cadre chaleureux. Elle met en valeur diverses productions locales, avec un souci éthique et écologique. Vous y trouverez des produits alimentaires (huiles, vinaigres, tapenades, apéritifs) et cosmétiques (savons, crèmes et lotions), ainsi que des ouvrages sur l’olivier, sa culture et bien sûr… l’huile d’olive !e ! Pour assouvir la curiosité du néophyte, une visite des lieux s’impose. Des vestiges, témoins de l’activité du Moulin dans des temps plus reculés ont été mis en valeur ici et là…. Dans la cour, une collection d’anciens outils agricoles est exposée. Jadis, ils servaient au travail du blé, de la garance et de la lavande. La meule principale et son mécanisme à eau reposent dans la boutique. Ils vous seront commentés sur demande, de mai à septembre. Et pourquoi ne pas profiter du site ? Avant de vous promener le long du Coulon, installez-vous : des tables de pique-nique sont à votre disposition Parmi les variétés qui font la renommée des huiles d’olives françaises, l’Aglandau se distingue de ses cousines par un goût surprenant, tantôt assimilé à l’artichaut, à la verdure ou aux fruits (poire, banane, pomme, amande). Principale variété du Vaucluse triturée au Moulin, elle est vigoureuse et résistante, et donne une huile de grand caractère. Les olives du Moulin Saint-Augustin ont une triple provenance : Luberon, vallée du Rhône et Monts du Vaucluse. Elles sont en majeure partie récoltées à la main, et sont travaillées plus ou moins rapidement après la cueillette, selon le type d’huile que l’on souhaite obtenir. Afin de développer une qualité gustative unique, Frédéric y associe la varié- té Salonenque. Les olives sélectionnées proviennent de vieux arbres non irri- gués. D’autre part, des passionnés confient au Moulin leur production de diverses variétés : la Picholine (pour sa force poivrée et amère), la Tanche (pour ses notes d’amande), la Cailletier (pour sa douceur et sa limpidité) et la Grossane (pour sa finesse). Au total, il faudra environ 4 à 6 kg d’olives pour obtenir 1 litre du précieux liquide. Pensez-y ! En le consommant, c’est toute la robustesse et la générosité de l’arbre que vous assimilez. Et à ses innombrables bienfaits s’ajoute le plaisir de déguster…Goût Des huiles, il y en a pour tous les goûts. Elles ne servent pas seulement à préparer l’Anchoïade, la tapenade et l’aïoli. Elles mettent en valeur vos salades, et rehaussent les plats les plus délicats, y compris certains desserts ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin élabore 2 huiles aux saveurs uniques que l’on retrouve aussi parmi ses produits dérivés proposés en boutique et sur le site du Moulin. le fruité vert est obtenu à partir d’olives en début de maturité dès novembre (Saint Véran) jusqu’aux premières gelées. Aglandau et Salonenque sont travaillées trois jours après réception, et donnent à l’huile une couleur allant du vert olive au vert pomme. Le fruité possède alors une saveur ardente avec un arrière- goût d’artichaut. Le fruité mûr est plus doux : la Salonenque est cueillie à maturité et l’Aglandau est récoltée après les premières gelées (Sainte-Catherine) jusqu’à Noël. Elles donnent une huile dorée, aux notes boisées se rapprochant de l’olive noire. Le Moulin propose dans sa boutique d’autres produits dérivés de l’huile ainsi que deux huiles aromatisées à la truffe et au basilic. Ces huiles composées d’olives de Salonenque sauront charmer vos subtiles papilles. À noter : l’huile obtenue à partir de l’Aglandau et de la Salonenque a ceci de spécifique qu’elle peut aussi être utilisée pour la cuisson, sans pour autant perdre son goût ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin est situé sur la rive droite du Coulon, à cheval sur les communes d’Oppède et de Ménerbes. Son histoire est ancienne : il y a longtemps il est le quartier des Hermitants qui y fabriquaident surtout de la farine, mais aussi du vin, de l’huile d’olive et du miel. En 1210, les moines partent pour Sénanque et revendent la propriété au Comte de Châteauneuf d’Anjou. Celui- ci la revendra à son tour à la famille du Marquis de Sade, à laquelle succéderont encore plusieurs familles de particuliers. L’activité du Moulin s’arrête avant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, et ne reprend qu’en 2000-2001. Grâce à la famille Nibbio qui l’acquiert en 1980, le bâtiment de pierre reprend vie. Il produit cette fois, non plus de la farine, mais de l’huile d’olive… qu’ils sauront vous faire apprécier.utique des Saveurs Accolée au Moulin, la boutique vous accueille dans un cadre chaleureux. Elle met en valeur diverses productions locales, avec un souci éthique et écologique. Vous y trouverez des produits alimentaires (huiles, vinaigres, tapenades, apéritifs) et cosmétiques (savons, crèmes et lotions), ainsi que des ouvrages sur l’olivier, sa culture et bien sûr… l’huile d’olive !e ! Pour assouvir la curiosité du néophyte, une visite des lieux s’impose. Des vestiges, témoins de l’activité du Moulin dans des temps plus reculés ont été mis en valeur ici et là…. Dans la cour, une collection d’anciens outils agricoles est exposée. Jadis, ils servaient au travail du blé, de la garance et de la lavande. La meule principale et son mécanisme à eau reposent dans la boutique. Ils vous seront commentés sur demande, de mai à septembre. Et pourquoi ne pas profiter du site ? Avant de vous promener le long du Coulon, installez-vous : des tables de pique-nique sont à votre disposition Parmi les variétés qui font la renommée des huiles d’olives françaises, l’Aglandau se distingue de ses cousines par un goût surprenant, tantôt assimilé à l’artichaut, à la verdure ou aux fruits (poire, banane, pomme, amande). Principale variété du Vaucluse triturée au Moulin, elle est vigoureuse et résistante, et donne une huile de grand caractère. Les olives du Moulin Saint-Augustin ont une triple provenance : Luberon, vallée du Rhône et Monts du Vaucluse. Elles sont en majeure partie récoltées à la main, et sont travaillées plus ou moins rapidement après la cueillette, selon le type d’huile que l’on souhaite obtenir. Afin de développer une qualité gustative unique, Frédéric y associe la varié- té Salonenque. Les olives sélectionnées proviennent de vieux arbres non irri- gués. D’autre part, des passionnés confient au Moulin leur production de diverses variétés : la Picholine (pour sa force poivrée et amère), la Tanche (pour ses notes d’amande), la Cailletier (pour sa douceur et sa limpidité) et la Grossane (pour sa finesse). Au total, il faudra environ 4 à 6 kg d’olives pour obtenir 1 litre du précieux liquide. Pensez-y ! En le consommant, c’est toute la robustesse et la générosité de l’arbre que vous assimilez. Et à ses innombrables bienfaits s’ajoute le plaisir de déguster…Goût Des huiles, il y en a pour tous les goûts. Elles ne servent pas seulement à préparer l’Anchoïade, la tapenade et l’aïoli. Elles mettent en valeur vos salades, et rehaussent les plats les plus délicats, y compris certains desserts ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin élabore 2 huiles aux saveurs uniques que l’on retrouve aussi parmi ses produits dérivés proposés en boutique et sur le site du Moulin. le fruité vert est obtenu à partir d’olives en début de maturité dès novembre (Saint Véran) jusqu’aux premières gelées. Aglandau et Salonenque sont travaillées trois jours après réception, et donnent à l’huile une couleur allant du vert olive au vert pomme. Le fruité possède alors une saveur ardente avec un arrière- goût d’artichaut. Le fruité mûr est plus doux : la Salonenque est cueillie à maturité et l’Aglandau est récoltée après les premières gelées (Sainte-Catherine) jusqu’à Noël. Elles donnent une huile dorée, aux notes boisées se rapprochant de l’olive noire. Le Moulin propose dans sa boutique d’autres produits dérivés de l’huile ainsi que deux huiles aromatisées à la truffe et au basilic. Ces huiles composées d’olives de Salonenque sauront charmer vos subtiles papilles. À noter : l’huile obtenue à partir de l’Aglandau et de la Salonenque a ceci de spécifique qu’elle peut aussi être utilisée pour la cuisson, sans pour autant perdre son goût ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin est situé sur la rive droite du Coulon, à cheval sur les communes d’Oppède et de Ménerbes. Son histoire est ancienne : il y a longtemps il est le quartier des Hermitants qui y fabriquaident surtout de la farine, mais aussi du vin, de l’huile d’olive et du miel. En 1210, les moines partent pour Sénanque et revendent la propriété au Comte de Châteauneuf d’Anjou. Celui- ci la revendra à son tour à la famille du Marquis de Sade, à laquelle succéderont encore plusieurs familles de particuliers. L’activité du Moulin s’arrête avant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, et ne reprend qu’en 2000-2001. Grâce à la famille Nibbio qui l’acquiert en 1980, le bâtiment de pierre reprend vie. Il produit cette fois, non plus de la farine, mais de l’huile d’olive… qu’ils sauront vous faire apprécier.utique des Saveurs Accolée au Moulin, la boutique vous accueille dans un cadre chaleureux. Elle met en valeur diverses productions locales, avec un souci éthique et écologique. Vous y trouverez des produits alimentaires (huiles, vinaigres, tapenades, apéritifs) et cosmétiques (savons, crèmes et lotions), ainsi que des ouvrages sur l’olivier, sa culture et bien sûr… l’huile d’olive !e ! Pour assouvir la curiosité du néophyte, une visite des lieux s’impose. Des vestiges, témoins de l’activité du Moulin dans des temps plus reculés ont été mis en valeur ici et là…. Dans la cour, une collection d’anciens outils agricoles est exposée. Jadis, ils servaient au travail du blé, de la garance et de la lavande. La meule principale et son mécanisme à eau reposent dans la boutique. Ils vous seront commentés sur demande, de mai à septembre. Et pourquoi ne pas profiter du site ? Avant de vous promener le long du Coulon, installez-vous : des tables de pique-nique sont à votre disposition Parmi les variétés qui font la renommée des huiles d’olives françaises, l’Aglandau se distingue de ses cousines par un goût surprenant, tantôt assimilé à l’artichaut, à la verdure ou aux fruits (poire, banane, pomme, amande). Principale variété du Vaucluse triturée au Moulin, elle est vigoureuse et résistante, et donne une huile de grand caractère. Les olives du Moulin Saint-Augustin ont une triple provenance : Luberon, vallée du Rhône et Monts du Vaucluse. Elles sont en majeure partie récoltées à la main, et sont travaillées plus ou moins rapidement après la cueillette, selon le type d’huile que l’on souhaite obtenir. Afin de développer une qualité gustative unique, Frédéric y associe la varié- té Salonenque. Les olives sélectionnées proviennent de vieux arbres non irri- gués. D’autre part, des passionnés confient au Moulin leur production de diverses variétés : la Picholine (pour sa force poivrée et amère), la Tanche (pour ses notes d’amande), la Cailletier (pour sa douceur et sa limpidité) et la Grossane (pour sa finesse). Au total, il faudra environ 4 à 6 kg d’olives pour obtenir 1 litre du précieux liquide. Pensez-y ! En le consommant, c’est toute la robustesse et la générosité de l’arbre que vous assimilez. Et à ses innombrables bienfaits s’ajoute le plaisir de déguster…Goût Des huiles, il y en a pour tous les goûts. Elles ne servent pas seulement à préparer l’Anchoïade, la tapenade et l’aïoli. Elles mettent en valeur vos salades, et rehaussent les plats les plus délicats, y compris certains desserts ! Le Moulin Saint-Augustin élabore 2 huiles aux saveurs uniques que l’on retrouve aussi parmi ses produits dérivés proposés en boutique et sur le site du Moulin. le fruité vert est obtenu à partir d’olives en début de maturité dès novembre (Saint Véran) jusqu’aux premières gelées. Aglandau et Salonenque sont travaillées trois jours après réception, et donnent à l’huile une couleur allant du vert olive au vert pomme. Le fruité possède alors une saveur ardente avec un arrière- goût d’artichaut. Le fruité mûr est plus doux : la Salonenque est cueillie à maturité et l’Aglandau est récoltée après les premières gelées (Sainte-Catherine) jusqu’à Noël. Elles donnent une huile dorée, aux notes boisées se rapprochant de l’olive noire. Le Moulin propose dans sa boutique d’autres produits dérivés de l’huile ainsi que deux huiles aromatisées à la truffe et au basilic. Ces huiles composées d’olives de Salonenque sauront charmer vos subtiles papilles. À noter : l’huile obtenue à partir de l’Aglandau et de la Salonenque a ceci de spécifique qu’elle peut aussi être utilisée pour la cuisson, sans pour autant perdre son goût !


      informations pratiques

      Informations tarif

      Gratuit

      Avis (0)

      Avis


      Il n’y pas encore d’avis.

      Be the first to review “Moulin Saint Augustin”


        Lubéron

        Moulin Saint Augustin

        Catégorie : Étiquette :

        Adresse

        Adresse

        2800 Route d'Apt

        Ville

        Cousteller Oppède

        Code postal

        84580

        Site web

        http://www.moulin-saintaugustin.com/

        Geolocalisation


        Description

        The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste!


        informations pratiques

        Informations tarif

        Free

        Avis (0)

        Avis


        Il n’y pas encore d’avis.

        Be the first to review “Moulin Saint Augustin”